cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Find articles, guides, information and community news

Most Recent
Super User II
Super User II

Recently, I have noticed that there was a lot of content talking about gzip decompress with Power Query, but I haven't seen someone talking about decompressing .zip files. The truth is that gzip is a most common file extension for data with the Azure suite. We can handle gzip with Azure Data Lake and Azure Data Factory. Anyway, in this article we will check how to decompress a ZIP file to explore your files inside, like a Windows folder in Power Query, in a very similar way as the gzip is done. If you haven't seen how gzip works, you can check this post about it.

Read more...

Resolver II
Resolver II

In this article I review the difference between data types, data formats and data categories available in Power Query and Power BI. It's a long topic and this post brings an introduction to that topic.

Read more...

Resolver I
Resolver I

Only 6% of Analytics Reporting in organizations source their data from standard databases. Oh no, I made up that number. I have no idea what the numbers are. But I am certain that the majority of self-service BI & data analytics users must deal with a lot of crappy data.

One of the big issues Power Query users must also deal with is Table Structuring. When should you use “Transpose” and when should you use “Unpivot”?

Read more...

Super User II
Super User II

This article will show how to get a data result with three different languages in order to help people learn one knowing another one. The languages are Python with Pandas library, T-SQL and Power Query M. This is an original post from LaDataWeb.

Read more...

Super User II
Super User II

This article will show how to create a Calendar table with T-SQL, Power Query and DAX languages that are necessary to do correct data modeling.

Read more...

Advocate I
Advocate I

title.png

 Change Source in Power BI Desktop is disabled

 

Changing a Data Source connection in Power BI Desktop is very simple, just two or three clicks, as you can see in these two very simple methods:

 

article_pwbi_1.png

 

Although it is a simple step to change the connection of a Data Source in Power BI Desktop, sometimes we face a problem that makes this change difficult, when the option button [Change Source ...] is disabled, which forces us to change manually within the Power Query Advanced Editor.

 

article_pwbi_2.png

 

So, first we need to understand the logic that Power BI uses and why this option appears disabled. Everything happens within Power Query, as you can see, the first step we cannot exclude, precisely because Power BI understands that every first step of each query will be the Data Source. That is, if we start a query creating a variable instead of starting with the connection to the Data Source, the option to change the Data Source in the simple way you saw at the beginning of this article will be automatically disabled.

 

article_pwbi_3.png

 

Conclusion:

 

What can we do to fix this problem? We need to create these variables in a separate query, so we can use these variables in any other Query and at any step of it, but not in the first, as you can see in the image below. Also, it is a good practice of queries organization.

 

article_pwbi_4.png

 

 

So, the first step of Query will always be the Data Source and you will always have the option button to change the Data Source activated, because Power BI will always find your first stage of Query your Data Source.

 

article_pwbi_50.png

 

Thank you for reading and give your feedback. 🙂

 

Super User II
Super User II

As a PowerBI administrator, it's always difficult to monitor the on-premises gateways within our organization, especically when the number of gateways has been growing rapidly. Today I'm going to explain how you can effecitivley administrate and monitor those gateways in PowerBI itself. Along with that, I'm going to give lots of Tips & Tricks

 

Gateway_monitoring.jpg

Read more...

MVP

This 2-part blog post is for working with ranges/bands of numbers in the Edit Queries stage of Power BI. The first part covers inexact lookups - looking up a number against a set of bands/ranges and returning the appropriate band which the number sits in. The second part looks at finding overlapping ranges - the scenario where we have two ranges/bands of numbers (rather than having one number and one set of bands) and we want to see the areas of overlap between the ranges.

Read more...

Helpful resources

Join Blog
Interested in blogging for the community? Let us know.